1

2011 - Omega Writers Inc CALEB Prize - finalist in Bookseller's Choice category
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2011 –Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards – the Gold Medal for Multicultural Non-Fiction for Young Adults
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2011 – Galley Club of Sydney Shortlist 2011 for Excellence in Non-Standard Mono Digital Production digitally
   - On the Trail with Sally Brown by Sally Brown
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2011 - Independent Publishers Book Awards, New York – Gold Medal for Multicultural Non-Fiction Juvenile-Teenage-Young Adult
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2005 – Galley Club of Sydney Award for Excellence in Non-Standard Production
   - To Be or Not to Be: A Dane in Australia by Sigurd Sjoquist and Paul Skye

2004 – Galley Club of Sydney Award for Excellence in Non-Standard Production
   - The Will to Win by Rod Barrett

1

2011 - Omega Writers Inc CALEB Prize - finalist in Bookseller's Choice category
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2011 –Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards – the Gold Medal for Multicultural Non-Fiction for Young Adults
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2011 – Galley Club of Sydney Shortlist 2011 for Excellence in Non-Standard Mono Digital Production digitally
   - On the Trail with Sally Brown by Sally Brown
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2011 - Independent Publishers Book Awards, New York – Gold Medal for Multicultural Non-Fiction Juvenile-Teenage-Young Adult
   - Lolli's Apple by Tomas Fleischmann

2005 – Galley Club of Sydney Award for Excellence in Non-Standard Production
   - To Be or Not to Be: A Dane in Australia by Sigurd Sjoquist and Paul Skye

2004 – Galley Club of Sydney Award for Excellence in Non-Standard Production
   - The Will to Win by Rod Barrett

51

Long Story Short:

Graeme Brosnan

You don’t have to be a war hero or a famous movie star to have a great story to tell. In this remarkable collection of true stories, every-day Australians bring to life in their own words those incredible moments of their lives where, seemingly in an instant, everything changes. Meet:

  • The twenty something telemarketer who moments before her impending death as her car is about to be flattened by a 100 tonne crane, takes off her glasses so her face won’t be scratched;
  • The refugee who was traded for a chicken on the battlefields of Europe,
  • A puny agricultural scientist, so shy he shook hands rather than kiss the love of his life, takes on the heavy weight boxing champion of the Northern Territory to defend her honour.
  • The hapless suburban accountant and his country bumpkin clients who somehow managed to outfox a multinational oil corporation;
  • A lovelorn pig shooter who buys a wrecking yard as a way to meet girls;
  • The irrepressible couple from Poland, who, after surviving the razing of Warsaw, set up a nightclub in the middle of their war ravaged country;
  • An all too plain girl from Flackwell Heath, with long, lanky legs and buck teeth who was inspired by a chance encounter with Mahatma Gandhi on a beach in India to become a writer;
  • And the Chinese orphan who went from Mao to God and along the way raised a family of four brilliant daughters in a one room house
Print on Demand from Amazon
Kindle version from Amazon Click Here to contact AKA Publishing staff about purchasing this title.

Circle of Stones:

Martin Van Den Berk

Two words sustained Martin van den Berk in his journey through life: faith and family. After witnessing the horrors of World War II as a boy in Holland, he mistakenly believed he had escaped the worst of it. Conscripted to carry our post-war reconstruction in Indonesia, Martin soon found himself in the middle of a deadly guerrilla war. He believes his faith saved him from certain death time and again. Determined to escape the devastation, Martin emigrated to New Zealand where he found a breathtakingly beautiful country and the woman who would give him seven children.

In this fearlessly frank, funny and sometimes extraordinary account of his life, Martin remembers the early years working as a mechanic, a farmer, and a baker; and somehow finding time to help his wife, Jane rear a family all the while pursuing his passion for tramping through the countryside with his beloved Scouts. Obsessed with multi-skilling decades before it became fashionable, he taught all his children to fend for themselves even though many of his own handyman adventures almost ended in calamity.

Raising a family of seven was never going to be easy, especially when mother and father liked to up stumps and move every couple of years, but somehow the van den Berks prospered and thrived. This story has it all – hard heartless work, strokes of good fortune, lives imperilled by deadly bushfires, bad luck, miraculous recoveries and being struck down in one’s prime – the family’s triumphs as well as tragedies – guided all the while by Martin’s unshakeable faith and unconditional love.

On The Trail of Sally Brown:

Sally Brown

Most kids can only dream of swapping the rigours of school for a life of adventure on the sun licked sand dunes of the Arabian Desert, but for Sally Brown this is where her education began. Tedious textbooks, arduous mathematical equations and poncy school teachers were ditched for camel riding, horse races and swimming or camping in the mountains on the Turkish/Iraqi border.  With her grandfather a Brigadier-General in the British Army in India and her father, a Group Captain of the RAF, Sally was destined to have an exotic upbringing.

Follow Sally from Egypt to the London bombings of World War II, then to Habbaniya, just outside Baghdad, and from there on to the clean-up of Germany after the war. As a young woman she lived through the swinging sixties in London where she met the love of her life. True to the nomadic patterns of her childhood years, Sally and her husband, Tony, moved to the blue skies of Australia where they lived in almost every state including some of the most remote and isolated settings in the country. Along the way, they encounter a spectacular array of eccentric characters, all the while, trying to raise their three daughters, Mandy, Nicola and Jess.

In this honest and heartfelt, beautiful story, Sally extricates the trials and tribulations of motherhood and the inherent loneliness that accompanies it. In an ode to her own mother, Sally reflects on her relationship with her parents, the constraints of the English class system, the dynamics of human relations in secluded towns, and the sacrifices made out of love for one’s children. A must read for all mothers and daughters.

To Be or not to Be: a Dane in Australia:

Paul Skye

On his arrival in Australia in 1939, Sigurd Sjoquist did what every respectable Danish gentleman did when it came to employment. He placed an advertisement in the newspaper which announced his arrival, listed his many qualifications, attributes and interests, and his current availability. Sig waited for the offers to roll in, but there were none. When none were forthcoming, the only job he could find was lugging carcasses in a slaughterhouse and shovelling tonnes of coal, wondering all the while what had ever possessed him to come to this strange land.

Sig was joined by his beloved Kirsten and shortly after their marriage, he volunteered for the Australian Army. He was dispatched to the Northern Territory with an advance party to halt the seemingly unstoppable advance of the Imperial Japanese Army. It was here that he learned survival skills from Xavier Herbert, the author of the novel Capricornia, and began to understand the character of these no nonsense Australians who had scant regard for the finer distinctions of class that still prevailed in Europe.

He returned from the war a mental and physical wreck. Kirsten thought he could regain his former vitality by taking art classes. Yet, it was Kirsten who found she had a natural talent as a painter exhibiting successfully in Sydney and New York. From such terrible beginnings, Sig went on to create the Mercator business empire, raise a family, and through his involvement with Rotary and other community groups, forge everlasting bonds between the people of his old home and his new found land.

Print on Demand from Amazon
Click Here to contact AKA Publishing staff about purchasing this title.

Transitional Years: The Jim Rees Story:

Jim Rees with Judy Huston

We have seen such massive changes in our cities over the last eighty years, yet people think that life in the country never changes. Jim Rees, a Boggabri/Croppa Creek boy to his boot straps, will set you straight on that. Jim was proud of his forebears who had fought for progress almost since European settlement and was determined to stand up and be counted in agricultural politics. After all, his great grandfather had witnessed the battle of the Eureka Stockade.

With a reputation for integrity and a nose for smelling a rat, Jim found himself leading a march of five Grain Handling Authority grower-directors on Parliament House. He represented his district on the shire council, was a key player in what became known as the Great Wheat Debate and was instrumental in advancing the cause of the wheat farmer.

This is no ordinary story. Jim also showed flair as an entrepreneur, starting a self-drive mini bus service and travelling to America to market his son’s infra-red guidance system for cultivators and sprayers. As well as documenting the revolution which has taken place in the bush in his lifetime, he tells of his life with his devoted wife Gwen, and his private struggles with illness and depression.

You Will Be Too Young:

Frederick Arthur Bowman

Flying in a Lancaster bomber at 20,000 feet over Nazi Germany, Fred Bowman looked around and reminded himself that less than two years before, this deadly crew were a sheep farmer, a policeman, a building society clerk, an audit clerk, a motor mechanic, a poultry farmer and a crane driver. Four of them were only twenty years old and they became life-long friends. In this remarkable memoir, Fred recalls his years as a wireless operator (air) with Bomber Command, where the casualties were appalling. Although only 2% of Australian servicemen served in Bomber Command, they accounted for over 20% of all Australians killed in action in World War II.

Fred joined the RAAF at the age of eighteen and kept a diary which forms the basis of this story. He documented his journey from Sydney to San Francisco, the Western Pacific train trip across America, and on to the wonders of New York. From there they sailed on to war ravaged England where his squadron dropped secret agents and their supplies into occupied Europe flying in a Stirling Bomber at such low levels they on one occasion returned with a tree branch in the tail wheel. Moonlight ruled their lives. They later converted to the legendary Lancaster on night bombing raids, dodging fighters and flak and praying they had enough fuel to return to base.

Fred witnessed the start of the D-Day invasion. His crew flew desperately needed food supplies into Holland and at war’s end airlifted allied prisoners of war back to England. His story is moving and amusing, and somehow in the most desperate of times Fred and his friends had some fun along the way.

The Toby Barton Story:

Toby Barton

Being the grandson of Australia’s first Prime Minister, Toby Barton grew up with an instinctive sense of public spirit. While still a student at Sydney Grammar, he caught a tram up to the recruitment centre in Moore Park and joined the Army. He fought overseas and was wounded in action in New Guinea. On his return to Australia, Toby completed his medical studies and fell in love with Janet, the woman who was to become his partner for life.

Very unassuming in nature, Toby is one of those brilliant people who make no fuss and just get on with things. He dedicated his life to working as a country GP dealing with all manner of emergencies, and having time for fun along the way. As an active member of the Scone theatre group, Toby would rush off stage to make a delivery at hospital and then return in time for his next scene.

Here he vividly recalls their wonderful life together, the raising of a family, blissful summer holidays on Clareville Beach, and the tragic death of his brother. Recognition of his service to the community came in 1999 when he was awarded an Order of Australia.

Print on Demand from Amazon
Click Here to contact AKA Publishing staff about purchasing this title.

Slow boats to china:

Penny Biggins

At the ripe old age of five, after his second day at school, Richard went missing on his way home. A search party was duly despatched and found him down by the river marshes happily sitting around a bonfire with the local gypsies. This was a scene repeated many times in his life, a little boy who loved adventure and spent most of his life searching for it.
When Richard was only seven, he went on a tour of the Houses of Parliament. Lady Astor, who was quite famous at the time said, “You’re not wearing a tie. You must be a little Bolshevik.” Richard was a boy soprano. His choir sang in five famous cathedrals and toured the Continent. Unable to drink the water in Belgium, the ten year-old choir boys were served beer instead.

He spent his teenage years living through the Blitz in London, where he saw shrapnel falling like rain and V1 flying bombs sailing past his bedroom window. After the war Richard found himself in the Merchant Navy and worked the infamous sea lanes of the China coast where smugglers traded with impunity. His first ship caught on fire not once, but four times. Another ship came under shell fire from the Communist Chinese. There were many strange days at sea and many wild nights on shore. Seedy dives, waterfront brawls, and hilarious happenings. With a fantastic eye for detail, Richard has many a tale to tell including what happens when sailors are captivated by the spell of Tahiti.

On his first trip to Australia, a chance meeting with Elaine on board ship at Melbourne’s Queen Victoria dock changed his life. After a few more years on the New Guinea run it was time to start life in a new country.

Print on Demand from Amazon
Click Here to contact AKA Publishing staff about purchasing this title.

DF a memoir:

Peter Burns

David Ralph Field, or DF to his mates, the son of an accountant, was born in Mosman at the time of the Great Depression. His father worked for the notorious Ezra Norton for whom he managed the legendary Trocadero nightclub as well as The Sun newspaper. He once claimed he made more money from "a couple of clowns playing a trumpet down at the Haymarket", than he did from the newspaper. Quite early on DF showed he was his father's son. He possessed a shrewd business brain and also forged a career as a financial manager. DF was one of life's rare creatures: an accountant with personality.

His business acumen was recognised early and as a young man he was sent by his employer to the parent company in England to learn more about the business. The 'lessons' started on the ship over where he learned to haggle and outfox the best of the Far East merchants. Once in England, he spent all his spare time touring the countryside and immersing himself in the country's ancient history. In a career at McMillan Bloedel spanning twenty-six years, DF rose to the top to become Managing Director a one of the biggest newsprint companies in the world.

A keen cricketer and swimmer, he lived life to the full. Everything changed when he was asked to take a young woman on a blind date. He and his date were incompatible, but through her he met her sister, his beloved Val. They married, built a home, and raised two wonderful children, Graeme and Carolyn.

Print on Demand from Amazon
Click Here to contact AKA Publishing staff about purchasing this title.

From Jaffas to winning post:

Penny Biggins

From a Penrith boyhood during WWII, John Shirlaw's journey of discovery and self-realisation resulted in a successful career as a respected and well-known Sydney accountant living in Mosman. John's love of sport can be seen as a metaphor for his life –  he always strove to win through hard work and application, he accepted defeat but didn't let it beat him, he played fairly and cleanly and above all, he had fun. This is the story of John Albert Shirlaw.

Print on Demand from Amazon
Click Here to contact AKA Publishing staff about purchasing this title.

A Man Unto Himself: The Gordon Longley Story:

Julie Ditrich

This is the story of Gordon Longley, an enigmatic man who had three constant loves all his life: swimming, tennis and music. Known to his friends as ‘Tooter’, he was a man of great independence and quite determined to live life under his own terms. Rejected by the RAAF on the grounds of myopia, he joined the 6th Division and fought in the Middle East and later New Guinea.

After the war he married and soon started a family. His entrepreneurial talents came to the fore and he started WAL Building Supplies which became a resounding success. Famous for his frugal nature, Gordon had a great sense of humour, primarily based on word puns and rhyming. All his life Gordon prided himself on his fitness. He read voraciously and was, in many ways, years ahead of his time – attending yoga classes long before they were fashionable. This was a man who lived his life to the full and beyond.

By Author: By Title:
1

Contact :

AKA Publishing

A.K.A. Publishing Pty Limited
We operate throughout Australia as well as New Zealand.
Tel: 1300 697 867
Fax: 1300 554 461
Email: admin@akapublishing.com.au
Please contact us today to find out more.